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Both engage in sole operator businesses as described above, and a few male brothels and escort agencies exist. In addition, transgender street-based sex workers are not uncommon.

Male sex workers aiming at a male clientele usually advertise in the gay newspaper Express or in New Zealand Truth until its closure in Manukau City in South Auckland consistently opposed the legislation. Manukau felt that street prostitution was particularly problematic in its area.

Manukau City Council 's portfolio leader for community safety, Councillor Dick Quax , was particularly critical. In , he said that "involvement of gangs and organised crime in street prostitution has become evident Street prostitution also attracts offensive litter, disorder, drugs, and intimidation", [45] and, "There are kids going to school with condoms lying on the street and prostitutes still standing around. It's dangerous, not only for the workers themselves, but for the rest of the community.

We're sick of it The community has had enough. It's not fun to come out in the morning and be having to clean up condoms lying in your garden and on the fence.

Cleaning up condoms and needles - it's just not fair. This has led to conflicts with the locals, which have attempted to curb this phenomenon, by trying to scare off prostitutes' customers, breaking negotiations between prostitutes and clients, and sending the prostitutes' clients letters, tracking them down through their car registration plates. A private Bill, the Manukau City Council Control of Street Prostitution Bill , led to hearings before a select committee, but failed to pass its second parliamentary reading on 11 October 46 votes to 73 [48] following a Select Committee Report that stated that, "initiatives supported by the local community, sex workers and their advocates, outreach workers, social agencies, and the police are a more effective and appropriate use of resources than the proposed legislated solution".

This resulted in critics of the legislation to be dissatisfied. Councillor Quax said that the review was very disappointing: Manukau then made a further attempt to regulate prostitution with the Manukau City Council Regulation of Prostitution in Specified Places Bill The future of the Bill was placed in doubt when Manukau City Council ceased to exist in late , being absorbed into the Auckland Council.

However, the new Auckland Council endorsed the bill [59] and in view of the municipal reorganisation Auckland was given till February to present its submission, the Committee hoping to report to parliament in March , enabling a second reading of the bill.

However, in late June , retiring Manurewa New Zealand Labour Party MP George Hawkins conceded that his private members bill had insufficient parliamentary support to pass its second reading, now scheduled for September , and said that the perceived "radical" expansion of the bill to encompass the whole of Auckland City would adversely affect any subsequent passage.

Other objections are local exemptions to national ambit legislation, and criticism from law enforcement and social service agencies that provide front-line health and social services to street sex workers. It was also seen as contravening the Bill of Rights. Despite such objections, local Papatoetoe businesses hope to invest in more closed circuit television surveillance cameras to deal with what they view as "anti-social" and "public nuisance" behaviour allegedly ancillary to street sex work.

Supporters of the sex workers argue that the behaviour in question may be unrelated to their presence, and linked to the early closure of public toilets and widespread alcohol outlets within the adjacent area. The private member's bill has since been reintroduced to Parliament, with strong criticism from the LGBT community.

They argue that the bill will disproportionately affect transgender street sex workers, given that gender identity is not covered within New Zealand's Human Rights Act They also argue that the Manukau and Auckland City Council have contributed to the situation through closure of public toilets and denial of the use of council rental accommodation to sex workers, and denounce what is argued to be vigilante tactics from some anti-sexworker local residents.

They argue that in instances of inappropriate sex worker behaviour, local councils, concerned residents, police, and business interests should rely on the Summary Offences Act Furthermore, the council is stated to have exaggerated the number of street sex workers. Whether or not this means that there will be a third private members bill to re-criminalize street sex work, despite this second consecutive defeat, is uncertain. However, given New Zealand First's opposition to prostitution law reform, one of their other MPs may do so.

For her party, New Zealand First Deputy Leader Tracey Martin spoke in support of the bill's passage during its second parliamentary reading and consequent defeat. Underage involvement in the sex industry continues to be a controversial issue in New Zealand, both before and after the passage of the PRA in , with conflicting claims of its extent or relationship to the PRA.

Child prostitution is illegal. The Prostitution Reform Act reads as follows: Prohibitions on use in prostitution of persons under 18 years No person may cause, assist, facilitate, or encourage a person under 18 years of age to provide commercial sexual services to any person. No person may receive a payment or other reward that he or she knows, or ought reasonably to know, is derived, directly or indirectly, from commercial sexual services provided by a person under 18 years of age.

No person may contract for commercial sexual services from, or be client of, person under 18 years 1 No person may enter into a contract or other arrangement under which a person under 18 years of age is to provide commercial sexual services to or for that person or another person.

Every person who contravenes section 20, section 21, or section 22 commits an offense and is liable on conviction on indictment to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 7 years. Thus, it is legal for a person under 18 to be a sex worker, but it is illegal for anyone else to profit from them in this capacity, or cause, assist, facilitate, or encourage them to provide commercial sexual services to any person.

It is also illegal for anyone to purchase sex from a person aged under The media are likely to require photographic ID before placing advertisements to ensure they are complying with this law. The defence of "reasonableness" has been removed, but sex workers appearing under age may be asked by Police to provide proof of age. However, there appears to be no law prohibiting a person under 18 from being a client of a prostitute, thus the legal age for this would presumably be 16, the legal age of consent in New Zealand.

Newspapers report on concerns about underage street workers [68] stating that this is the commonest entry point into the trade for them [69] and that some of them may be being pimped by gang members.

Reports have cited some community workers who stated that they had found girls "as young as 10 or 11" selling sex, and one mentioned students from a West Auckland high school who "turned tricks" at lunchtime. Convictions have been obtained against operators who did not check ID and hired under age workers.

There have been several cases in Christchurch. In , ECPAT New Zealand and the Stop Demand Foundation agencies which combat the sexual exploitation of children ,commenting on the Ministry of Justice's report "The Nature and Extent of the Sex Industry in New Zealand", [76] questioned the effectiveness of New Zealand's legislation in relation to underage prostitution; the agencies pointed to a police survey of the New Zealand sex industry which showed that children under the age of 18 years were identified as selling sex, with three-quarters being concentrated in one Police District.

Despite these claims, police have continued to bring prosecutions for underage prostitution against the brothels despite relaxed oversight. The NZ government has criticised the US reports as being based on faulty and biased data sets. For example, it appears that the State Department ignored material in the Prostitution Law Review Committee Report, which indicated there was no evidence of increased underage sex work in the New Zealand sex industry.

It was founded in by, among others, Catherine Healy , and received funding from the Minister of Health in , and subsequently the Department of Health which became the Ministry of Health.

The organisation played a major part in the decriminalisation of prostitution. Together with studies by the Crime and Justice Research Centre at Victoria University [88] [89] [90] [91] provided the Prostitution Law Review Committee with the evidence based facts that it required to reach a conclusion about the effect of the Prostitution Reform Act on sex workers.

In its "Report of the Prostitution Law Review Committee on the Operation of the Prostitution Reform Act " the committee provided further information on many of the cases and background of sex work in New Zealand. The researchers described this process further in a book, titled "Taking the crime out of sex work- New Zealand sex workers' fight for decriminalisation" [92] It was written by Gillian Abel a senior public health researcher and lecturer at the University of Otago , New Zealand , Lisa Fitzgerald a public health sociologist and social science lecturer in the School of Population Health, University of Queensland , and Catherine Healy a founding member of the New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective.

The book includes the results of interviews with over sex workers, and concludes that the decriminalisation has had positive effects for the prostitutes safety and health. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Since decriminalisation, street prostitution has spiralled out of control, especially in New Zealand's largest city, Auckland. New Zealand Prostitutes' Collective. New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage.

Retrieved 16 April Retrieved 15 May The Journal of the Polynesian Society. Retrieved 12 March Practical Statutes of New Zealand. Sex Work and Sex Workers in Australia. University of New South Wales Press. Tracing the emergence of feminist consciousness in nineteenth-century New Zealand". Women's Studies International Forum. Taking the crime out of sex work: New Zealand sex workers' fight for decriminalisation.

The Open Society, Winter 77 2: Scoop News Press release. Retrieved 15 March Archived from the original PDF on 19 February New Zealand Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 18 March Retrieved 16 March What really happened in New Zealand after prostitution was decriminalized in ?

Prostitution Research and Education. Retrieved 23 March The opposition's rebuttal remarks". Archived from the original on 22 October National Party press release Press release. Shadow boxing with brothels". Victoria University of Wellington. The impact of the Prostitution Reform Act on the health and safety practices of sex workers.

The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 4 November Retrieved 10 June Archived from the original PDF on 16 June Retrieved 14 August Archived from the original on 4 March Archived from the original on 23 May Manukau welcomes the progress of the street prostitution bill to the Select Committee Sept 9 Archived 29 September at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 20 June Archived from the original on 8 March Archived from the original on 24 July Law Archived 29 December at the Wayback Machine.

Ministry of Justice, New Zealand. Archived from the original on 9 February Retrieved 22 June Archived from the original on 17 December International Approaches to Decriminalising or Legalising Prostitution. Models of Best Practice. The Prostitution Reform Act ". Archived from the original on 21 July Archived from the original on 22 May Decriminalisation of sex industry positive move Jordan, J Working Girls: Transsexual prostitution in New Zealand: Predominance of persons of Maori extraction, Arch Sex Behav 13 4: Sex, law and social control - the sex industry in New Zealand today.

Early developmental experiences of female sex workers: Services and information utilised by female sex workers for sexual and physical safety. The mental and physical health of female sex workers: A 'segmented' sex industry in New Zealand: Weinberg, Heather Worth and Colin J. Child Prostitution — New Zealand. Medicine, sexuality and imperialism: British medical discourses surrounding venereal disease in New Zealand and Japan: They then pay an annual licence fee.

There are89 licensed brothels operating in Victoria. Private sex workers must get a free registration number from the authority, which allows them to operate alone. There are more than of these owner-operated businesses registered at present. There's a fascination with sex workers so, on Twitter, people can interact with me and I like to not take it too seriously.

The financial gains for private escorts can be substantial. After paying tax, they take home per cent of their earnings, compared to an average of 50 per cent in a brothel. But brothel owners argue that the risks of working alone outweigh the financial benefits.

Eve, an escort who works at the Pink Palace, says she chose a brothel over private work because of the safety aspect.

In her mids, she is studying law full time at university and did her research on the industry before entering it about six months ago. And Robyn Smith says some sex workers have arrived at the Pink Palace after frightening experiences. Here, in the 15 years I've been here there's never been any incidents. Of course, it is in the brothels' interests to highlight the risks of working alone. Many of those operating privately say the threat of violence and abuse are blown way out of proportion.

Cameron, a male-to-male escort based in New South Wales, says in 30 years he has never been a victim of violence. If I wanted to go into an unsafe profession I would become a nurse or a taxi driver. Some brothel owners also fear the impact of hook-up apps on their businesses. But Cameron says that, although apps such as Grindr are utilised in the gay escort industry, they are not a major player. They are more commonly used by someone offering cash for sex as a one-off, or by someone who works only occasionally, rather than regular sex workers, he says.

Some Australian online services directories are incorporating app-like features. Jonslist — launched this year— is run by Jackie Crown, herself a former sex worker. Independent sex workers say online advertising and marketing are a positive. Many use a range of marketing tools including their own websites, online directories, Twitter and other social media, and sometimes hook-up apps. The industry is frustrated that the Victorian Sex Work Act has not moved sufficiently into the digital age.

Fawkes says Victorian sex workers face prohibitive regulations around advertising, while those in other states don't. In an era when the internet does not adhere to state boundaries, this makes things tricky, and in some cases makes the law look plain stupid.

This is a problem for Victorian escorts who want to protect their privacy and end up displaying a blurred-out face and a set of shoulders. Meanwhile, workers in NSW and Queensland are allowed to display full body pictures.

However, as Fairfax Media discovered, Victorian-based escorts can still post full-body nudes online via their Twitter account. This does not flout the law because they are not actually advertising their business on Twitter, they are just using social media. So are a lot of people. The Eros Foundation, an adult entertainment industry group, also wants change. Its executive officer Fiona Patten is founder of the Australian Sex Party and will contest the upper house Northern Metro region at next month's state election.

Victorian workers are also prohibited from listing the specific services they offer, unlike workers in Queensland and New South Wales.

So Victorian sex workers often set up websites with a section for Victorian clients that doesn't list services and a section for interstate and international clients that does. But a Victorian punter only has to click on the interstate section to see the services listed. A spokeswoman for Victoria's Consumer Affairs Minister, Heidi Victoria, says current regulations, including advertising controls, expire in A consultation process for new regulations will start next year and stakeholders will include sex workers and brothel licensees.

These are all issues for sex workers attempting to stay within the law. But there is another cohort deliberately operating outside the law.

Many such examples can be easily found online, much to the disgust of Albon and many brothel owners, who are paying heavy licence fees to adhere to regulations. A couple of clicks through the Melbourne personals section of some online classifieds sites reveal a number of explicit and lurid ads for sex acts in exchange for cash.

None of these advertisers display a registration number from the Business Licensing Authority and many promote specific sex acts or mention their ethnic origin, all of which flouts the advertising regulations. There are also many such classifieds advertising massage parlours with "happy endings", in reality illegal brothels offering sex that are masquerading as massage services. A spokeswoman for Minister for Consumer Affairs Heidi Victoria says the activities of illegal brothels and sex workers are a matter for the Victoria Police.

Consumer Affairs Victoria, however, monitors and enforces compliance in relation to online advertising by licensed brothels and legal private workers. CAV "welcomes information about any of those parties ads in breach of regulations," the spokeswoman says, suggesting scrutiny is reactive rather than proactive.

A Victoria Police spokeswoman says such issues can only be investigated if an official complaint is made against a specific ad. She was unable to answer questions about monitoring online activity.

We're paying these massive fees and what services are they providing in return to protect our industry? The answer is near nought. Female escort Savannah Stone had her own pre-conceived ideas about the industry before she started sex work four years ago. Stone moved here from the US when she was 21 after completing a marketing degree.

Then, when I wanted a change, I decided to look into sex work. She has never worked in a brothel but worked for an escort agency for about eight months before deciding to go private. She has her own professionally designed website, which includes a blog and her own Twitter account.

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